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Credibility of Website  

Tips and tricks to decide if a webpage/website is appropriate for scholarly research.
Last Updated: Sep 13, 2017 URL: http://chandler.greenville.libguides.com/credibility Print Guide

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Wikipedia? Is it Useful?

 

SC College and Career Readiness Standards

3.3 Gather information from a variety of primary and secondary sources and evaluate sources for perspective, validity, and bias. 3.3 Gather information from a variety of primary and secondary sources and evaluate sources for perspective, validity, and bias. 3.3 Gather information from a variety of primary and secondary sources and evaluate sources for perspective, validity, and bias

5.1 Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 5.1 Cite multiple examples of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 5.1 Cite the evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

6.1 Provide an objective summary of a text with two or more central ideas; cite key supporting details. 6.1 Provide an objective summary of a text with two or more central ideas; cite key supporting details to analyze their development. 6.1 Provide an objective summary of a text with two or more central ideas; cite key supporting details to analyze their development.

7.1 Integrate information presented in different media or formats to develop a coherent understanding of a topic or issue. 7.1 Compare and contrast a text to an audio, video, or multimedia version of the text, analyzing each medium’s portrayal of the subject. 7.1 Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums to present a particular topic or idea.

10.1 Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the perspective represented. 10.1 Determine an author’s perspective or purpose and analyze how the author distinguishes his/her position from others. 10.1 Determine an author’s perspective or purpose and analyze how the author acknowledges or responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints.

11.2 Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims, distinguishing claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not. 11.2 Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims. 11.2 Analyze and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; recognize when irrelevant evidence is introduced.

1.1 Write arguments that: a. introduce a focused claim and organize reasons and evidence clearly; b. use information from multiple print and multimedia sources; c. support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence, using credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text;f. paraphrase, quote, and summarize, avoiding plagiarism and providing basic bibliographic information for sources;

 

Evaluation Sources Worksheet

Evaluating Information Sources

Information Source Criteria

Your evaluation 0-5 (0=worst; 5=best)

 

Currency: Timeliness of the Resource

        Is the publication date recent, especially if the relevance of the source is important to the topic?

        Is a copyright date OR last updated date provided?

 

Relevance: The importance of/connection to the information for your research interest/question

        Does this information source answer a question I have about my topic OR does it help develop a new question to pursue for my topic?

        To what extent does this topic expand/broaden my understanding of my topic OR help me find a new aspect of the topic to explore?

 

Authority: Credibility and expertise of the person or group that authored the information

        Who is the author/publisher/source/sponsor of this information source?

        What makes this person or group qualified to publish this information OR what makes this person/group an expert on the topic?

        What are the author’s credentials and/or organizational affiliations?

        Is the author or group qualified to write on the topic?

        Is there contact information for the author, such as a name, publisher, email address or Twitter account/handle?

 

Accuracy: The Reliability, Truthfulness, Objectivity, and Correctness of the Content

        Is the information supported by evidence/facts?

        Can you verify any of the information in another information source?

        Does the language and tone of the information source seem unbiased, objective, and free of emotion or personal opinions?

       Are there any political, ideological, cultural, religious, institutional, or personal biases?

        Are there spelling, grammar, or typographical errors?

 

Purpose: The Reason the Information Exists

        Does the author make his/her intentions or purpose for the information clear?

        What is the purpose of the information: to inform, teach, sell, entertain, or persuade?

        Is the information primarily facts, opinions, or propaganda (info., often biased/misleading designed to promote a certain point of view)?

 

 

How is this information most helpful to your searching at this point? If it is not helpful, why?

 

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